Notifications
Clear all

Oil Changes

13 Posts
6 Users
0 Likes
88 Views
rlcbushpilot avatar
(@rlcbushpilot)
New Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  
How often do you change your oil?

   
Quote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
Here is what was supposed to be the rest of my post.? For some reason Yahoo cut it off!

How often do you guys change the oil in your AEIO-360 powered airplanes?? The manual says 50 hours with an external filter and 25 without.? The guy I bought my airplane from was doing them at 25 hours even though my engine has a filter.? I'm just curious about what everyone else does.

Ron


   
ReplyQuote
Joe Preston avatar
(@joe-preston)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1143
 
I am moving from 25 hours to 50 with an external oil filter and using Camguard. 
I use Phillips 20w50.
Ed Kolin (sp) from Camguard said 50 is fine with that setup. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2017, at 21:09, Ron Cardwell cardwell.ron@gmail.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Here is what was supposed to be the rest of my post.  For some reason Yahoo cut it off!

How often do you guys change the oil in your AEIO-360 powered airplanes?  The manual says 50 hours with an external filter and 25 without.  The guy I bought my airplane from was doing them at 25 hours even though my engine has a filter.  I'm just curious about
what everyone else does.

Ron


   
ReplyQuote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
50 hours worked for me twice to 2000hours. 
 
   ----Red GL. In N. Fla----

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2017, at 22:05, Joe Preston Joe@Preston-Company.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

I am moving from 25 hours to 50 with an external oil filter and using Camguard. 
I use Phillips 20w50.
Ed Kolin (sp) from Camguard said 50 is fine with that setup. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2017, at 21:09, Ron Cardwell cardwell.ron@gmail.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Here is what was supposed to be the rest of my post.  For some reason Yahoo cut it off!

How often do you guys change the oil in your AEIO-360 powered airplanes?  The manual says 50 hours with an external filter and 25 without.  The guy I bought my airplane from was doing them at 25 hours even though my engine has a filter.  I'm just curious about
what everyone else does.

Ron


   
ReplyQuote
John Duncan avatar
(@john-duncan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 174
 

Generally, I would change oil at 50 hours.  Fly at least every week or so for an hour or more and make certain the oil temp reaches and remains at operating temp.  AND, fine tune your hours between oil changes by having an oil analysis performed at every
oil change.  It is inexpensive insurance, Blackstone Labs. does good analysis.

John Duncan

Great Lakes Aircraft 

Warner Engines


From: greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Jeff Edwards jeffed6161@hotmail.com [greatlakesbiplane]

Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2017 9:19 PM
To: greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [greatlakesbiplane] Re: Oil Changes

 
 

50 hours worked for me twice to 2000hours. 
 
   ----Red GL. In N. Fla----

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2017, at 22:05, Joe Preston Joe@Preston-Company.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

I am moving from 25 hours to 50 with an external oil filter and using Camguard. 
I use Phillips 20w50.
Ed Kolin (sp) from Camguard said 50 is fine with that setup. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2017, at 21:09, Ron Cardwell cardwell.ron@gmail.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Here is what was supposed to be the rest of my post.  For some reason Yahoo cut it off!

How often do you guys change the oil in your AEIO-360 powered airplanes?  The manual says 50 hours with an external filter and 25 without.  The guy I bought my airplane from was doing them at 25 hours even though my engine has a filter.  I'm just curious about
what everyone else does.

Ron


   
ReplyQuote
jjccampbell avatar
(@jjccampbell)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 14
 
About every 25-30 hours, keep it at 7 Qts minimum, TBO is 1600 hrs but over that now.

   
ReplyQuote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
I have to disagree with the preceding post which says oil change 25-30 hours and keep
It above 7 quarts. 
I'll put my AEIO-360 engine time against anyone. Bought my Lakes with 440 hours on it in 1989, just went past 4100 hours on the tach. Not bragging, just saying I've been there through 2 overhauls. We My Cam made it to 3900 hours
before it needed to be replaced for wear. 
I've consistently changed oil/filter at 50 hours. Cut the filter open and done oil samples at that time. No negatives results have been noted. My 2 overhauls have been at 2100 hrs in 2000 and at 3950 last summer. Went with new  millennium
cylinders at both overhauls due to the couple of hundred dollars difference between overhauling a cylinder and replacing it. 
As far as running a quantity of oil, if I try to run anything above 6 1/2 quarts it will throw it out the breather within an hour down to 6 1/2.. Therefore I run between 5 1/2 and 6 1/2 quarts. If I can quote Dick Rutan on his flight
with Mike Melville in the Longezees around the world. I asked him after his 14 hour flight from Brazil to South Africa was he worried about oil consumption. He said they just put 8 quarts in the 360 before they took off and then added "it's a Lycoming, it
will run on a quart and a half!"  Just sayin'!!
     ----Red GL in N FLA----

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 23, 2017, at 10:35, jjccampbell@yahoo.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

About every 25-30 hours, keep it at 7 Qts minimum, TBO is 1600 hrs but over that now.


   
ReplyQuote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
I subscribe to 50 hour intervals between oil/filter changes. 7 quarts is the level my Lycoming seems to like for itself. The 8th quart only lubes the tailwheel. You gotta love where the breather terminates, saves a lot wiping off the belly. 

A quart and a half can't give you much cooling. Our ships are already hot blooded. I did burp several quarts overboard when the inverted check ball stuck while sustaining inverted flight.  If you choose to look at the world upside down. I'd recommend every 5th change you pull the check valve and canister off and flush them with solvent like Lycoming recommends. Especially if it has been long stints between inverted sorties. Crud and goo will accumulate on the seldom used port, waiting to grab a check ball. 
Be the wing, Bill

   
ReplyQuote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
Bill has a good point about the inverted flight balls. Have replaced mine once, due to corrosion. You can get them from the Pitts guys at Aviat in WY. 
Another problem I had was puking oil out of the breather. Or as Bill would say lubing the tailwheel. Turns out the air/oil separator tank has a flop ball in it and if it sticks you will cause the oil/water to puke out the breather
tube. Removed and flushed it out with Mineral Spirits and it freed it up which solved the issue. 
If you stop getting the oil/water out of the drain near the tailwheel I have a fix for that. Get a 12 gauge shotgun cleaner from your local outdoor store and a 25 foot spoil of medium gauge aluminum wire. Disconnect the rubber line
from the air/oil separator at the firewall. Then snake the wire throb fuselage tube all the way to the tail. When you pull the shotgun cleaner thru the tube at the end of the aluminum wire, you'll be impressed at the consistency of oil (like chocolate pudding)
you remove from inside your fuselage tube. 
Just a couple of ideas at annual time or whenever. 
    ----Red GL in N FLA--
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 24, 2017, at 06:41, billstockl@msn.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

I subscribe to 50 hour intervals between oil/filter changes. 7 quarts is the level my Lycoming seems to like for itself. The 8th quart only lubes the tailwheel. You gotta love where the breather terminates, saves a lot wiping off the belly. 

A quart and a half can't give you much cooling. Our ships are already hot blooded. I did burp several quarts overboard when the inverted check ball stuck while sustaining inverted flight.  If you choose to look at the world upside down. I'd recommend every
5th change you pull the check valve and canister off and flush them with solvent like Lycoming recommends. Especially if it has been long stints between inverted sorties. Crud and goo will accumulate on the seldom used port, waiting to grab a check ball. 
Be the wing, Bill

   
ReplyQuote
pmikolaj avatar
(@pmikolaj)
Eminent Member
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 48
 
50 hour oil changes here, flying about 25-30 hours/month.  
Spewage related question:  getting a good amount of what looks like fuel our of one of the drain tubes by the left strut.  Not alarming, but enough to have to wipe it down after every flight.  Am I priming too much, or is it something else?  Yes doing acro.
Paul 

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 24, 2017, at 06:45, Jeff Edwards jeffed6161@hotmail.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Bill has a good point about the inverted flight balls. Have replaced mine once, due to corrosion. You can get them from the Pitts guys at Aviat in WY. 
Another problem I had was puking oil out of the breather. Or as Bill would say lubing the tailwheel. Turns out the air/oil separator tank has a flop ball in it and if it sticks you will cause the oil/water to puke out the breather
tube. Removed and flushed it out with Mineral Spirits and it freed it up which solved the issue. 
If you stop getting the oil/water out of the drain near the tailwheel I have a fix for that. Get a 12 gauge shotgun cleaner from your local outdoor store and a 25 foot spoil of medium gauge aluminum wire. Disconnect the rubber line
from the air/oil separator at the firewall. Then snake the wire throb fuselage tube all the way to the tail. When you pull the shotgun cleaner thru the tube at the end of the aluminum wire, you'll be impressed at the consistency of oil (like chocolate pudding)
you remove from inside your fuselage tube. 
Just a couple of ideas at annual time or whenever. 
    ----Red GL in N FLA--
Sent from my iPhone
On Apr 24, 2017, at 06:41, billstockl@msn.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

I subscribe to 50 hour intervals between oil/filter changes. 7 quarts is the level my Lycoming seems to like for itself. The 8th quart only lubes the tailwheel. You gotta love where the breather terminates, saves a lot wiping off the belly. 

A quart and a half can't give you much cooling. Our ships are already hot blooded. I did burp several quarts overboard when the inverted check ball stuck while sustaining inverted flight.  If you choose to look at the world upside down. I'd recommend every
5th change you pull the check valve and canister off and flush them with solvent like Lycoming recommends. Especially if it has been long stints between inverted sorties. Crud and goo will accumulate on the seldom used port, waiting to grab a check ball. 
Be the wing, Bill

   
ReplyQuote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
Hey Paul, Not sure what your priming procedure is but I'm very frugal on the prime. Could be too much prime. Too much isn't good and too little can be compensated by pumping the go lever. I don't even look at the boost switch if the oil temp gage moves the slightest. Are you referring to the fuel drain tubes that exit the cowling on the bottom left side? If so, make sure the induction elbow drain is clear, could also be a seeping gascolator as one of those lines is the drain, check and lube the linkage. The other thing to recognize is a bad fuel pump diaphragm is vented that path too. 


Be the wing, Bill

   
ReplyQuote
pmikolaj avatar
(@pmikolaj)
Eminent Member
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 48
 
Thanks Bill!  I will look at those items.  Indeed, these are the drain tubes I am referring to.
Paul
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 25, 2017, at 14:59, billstockl@msn.com [greatlakesbiplane] <greatlakesbiplane@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Hey Paul, Not sure what your priming procedure is but I'm very frugal on the prime. Could be too much prime. Too much isn't good and too little can be compensated by pumping the go lever. I don't even look at the boost switch if the oil temp gage moves the slightest. Are you referring to the fuel drain tubes that exit the cowling on the bottom left side? If so, make sure the induction elbow drain is clear, could also be a seeping gascolator as one of those lines is the drain, check and lube the linkage. The other thing to recognize is a bad fuel pump diaphragm is vented that path too. 


Be the wing, Bill

   
ReplyQuote
John Hofmann avatar
(@johnhofmann)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7241
 
Paul, When you open the cowl you can trace the plumbing. The drain from the induction elbow should have a rubber hose and hose clamps. That's so you can disconnect it and run a pipe cleaner through the line. You'll also see the tee in one of those lines that leads to the engine driven fuel pump. In the  event the diaphragm leaks, it ports the fuel through the vent. If it isn't your ops I'd suspect the sump drain ( could be sticky linkage or worn out valve).  Over boosting and/or rowing the throttle on a dead engine can cause a puddle of fuel to form and drain from the induction elbow. If the drain line is partially plugged the seep can happen for a long time afterwards ( blue sticky syrup). You should be able to identify which vent is the culprit and narrow down the possibilities. 

Be the wing, Bill

   
ReplyQuote
Share: